Minds Matter Boston offers student volunteer co-mentors

Nga Truong, 18, came to the United States with her parents from Vietnam at the age of six. She said she remembers making the transition was hard. “When I came here, (I) could hardly speak English, (I) had so many problems,” she said. Truong said her parents were still working on learning the language. “They’ve learned a little bit over the years,” she said. “But they’re still fighting. I’m the most fluent.” excelled in school. She was accepted early to Boston University. She worked toward this accomplishment for years, as did Emily Wickstrom and Tade Mengesha, her two co-mentors from an organization called Minds Matter Boston. As of 2019, Wickstrom and Mengesha met with Truong every week during the school year to help her with college preparation. “It’s just going to be very personal for you,” Wickstrom said. “It doesn’t feel like you’re trying very hard.” I know college was really hard for me,” added Mengesha. “It’s really easy to miss out, not because of your own fault, just because it’s so complicated.”Minds Matter Boston, which supports students from low-income backgrounds, reports that 100% of its program graduates are admitted to four-year schools The mentoring program learns about college admissions and financial aid. They are also supported through academic summer programs with exam preparation and more. “There’s this phenomenon called ‘undermatching,’ where students from low-income backgrounds are less likely to try to apply to private schools and to highly selective schools,” Wickstrom said. “What we can do is unlock that potential in children .” Truong said she is grateful to Minds Matter Boston and her mentors. She said that while her parents are unfamiliar with the college process, they certainly understand what her acceptance into BU means. “It was the first time I saw my father cry,” she said. “Well, it was like amazing for me. “To be accepted as a mentee into the Minds Matter Boston program, a student must have a good grade point average, be motivated, and qualify for a free or discounted lunch. Minds Matter Boston is currently recruiting for mentors. There are always two mentors with one Mentee Information on Minds Matter Boston can be found here.

Nga Truong, 18, came to the United States with her parents from Vietnam at the age of six. She said she remembers having a tough time transitioning.

“When I came here, (I) hardly knew any English, (I) was struggling so much,” she said.

Truong said her parents were still working on learning the language.

“They’ve learned a little bit over the years,” she said. “But they’re still fighting. I am the most fluent.”

Truong, who just graduated from the John D. O’Bryant School of Mathematics and Science in Roxbury, excelled at school.

She was accepted early to Boston University.

She has worked towards this achievement for years, as have Emily Wickstrom and Tade Mengesha, her two co-mentors from an organization called Minds Matter Boston.

As of 2019, Wickstrom and Mengesha met with Truong every week during the school year to help her with college preparation.

“It’s just going to be very personal for you,” Wickstrom said. “It doesn’t feel like you’re trying very hard.”

“I know college was really hard for me,” added Mengesha. “It’s really easy to miss something, not through your own fault, but simply because it’s so complicated.”

Minds Matter Boston, which supports students from low-income backgrounds, reports that 100% of its program graduates have gained admission to four-year schools.

Students who are accepted into the mentoring program find out about university admissions and financial support. They are also supported through academic summer programs with exam preparation and more.

“There’s this phenomenon called ‘under-matching,’ where low-income students are less likely to try to apply to private schools and to highly selective schools,” Wickstrom told Children.”

Truong said she is grateful to Minds Matter Boston and her mentors. She said that while her parents are unfamiliar with the college process, they certainly understand what her acceptance into BU means.

“It was the first time I saw my father cry,” she said. “Well, it was like stunning for me.”

To be accepted as a mentee in the Minds Matter Boston program, a student must have a good grade point average, be motivated, and qualify for a free or discounted lunch.

Minds Matter Boston is currently looking for mentors. There are always two mentors assigned to a mentee.

Information on Minds Matter Boston can be found here.

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